Dragon Quest Builders’ PS Vita Version Sells Best, Japanese Store Managers Report; Shortages Possible

on January 28, 2016 3:33 PM

Today Square Enix’s Minecraft-meets-JRPG title Dragon Quest Builders was launched in Japan, and early reports indicate that it’s doing very well.

Producer Noriyoshi Fujimoto mentioned on Twitter that there might be shortages of the physical retail version, encouraging those unable to secure a copy to consider the digital download version, and promising that Square Enix will ship additional copies as soon as possible.

The store manager of the popular Tokyo-based independent store Games Ma-Ya, in the Edogawa district, reports that sales have been “amazing,” with the PS Vita version leading, followed by the PS4 version and with the PS3 version in last place. She also mentioned that customers purchasing the game were mostly Dragon Quest fans, and the age range seemed higher than usual.

The manager of PAO, in the Nishitama district of Tokyo, echoes pretty much the same data, and provides more detail: during the first day of sales the PS Vita version sold 34% of the initial shipment at his shop, placing first. The PS4 version sold 47%, ranking second (evidently the shop had more copies of the PS Vita version), while the PS3 version ranked third with 51% of the initial shipment sold.

The proportions of sales was 3 PS Vita : 2 PS4 : 1 PS3.

It’ll be interesting to see the final tally on Wednesday, when Media Create will provide sales numbers. One thing is for sure: Square Enix would be crazy not to localize this, even if we don’t have any official announcement yet.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.