Electronic Arts Explains How they Plan to Avoid Launch Problems for the Future

on May 17, 2016 8:44 PM

During Electronic Arts’ Investor Day, the company’s executive team talked about the measures they’re taking to make sure that games launch with a good degree of stability, avoiding problems like what happened with Battlefield 4.

EA Studios Executive Vice President Patrick Söderlund gave the point of view of the development arm of the publisher, mentioning that it was just the Battlefield 4 launch that came with problems, and there are multiple reasons to why that happened. One of them was a launch on completely new platforms.

Luckily moving towards a single engine has made a profound impact on how Electronic Arts’ games are launched. It’s something that the company will continue to monitor, and that it’s “super important” for them.

Chief Technology Officer Ken Moss also added that the company works “super hard” to provide a perfect experience at launch and 24/7 after that. That includes testing the scale of the services, adopting the cloud to accommodate higher demand than expected when necessary, with the possibility to do better “busting” (basically moving applications into the cloud to meet peak demand).

The services team also has a really deep partnership with the game teams, and they always think about the players first, with the priority on having the games available. There’s a long list of things they’re doing to ensure that everything works, and they take it “extremely seriously.”

There have been learnings in the recent pasts from successful launches like Star Wars: Battlefront and Battlefield Hardline, and they are all applied into the upcoming releases. Moss also mentioned that the team is “paranoid” about this, but it’s something that they’ll continue improving on, and they’re optimistic about.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.