Fan Project Pokemon Prism Leaked on 4chan, Despite Nintendo Takedown Notice

on December 30, 2016 9:38 PM

The day following Nintendo’s takedown notice, developer Koolboyman’s fan project Pokemon Prism has been released to the whole internet thanks to some benevolent 4chan hackers. The game, an eight year project built as an homage to Game Boy Advanced-era Pokemon titles, is now widely available — despite the developer’s website’s shutdown.

Originally set to release on December 25, 2016, Nintendo served the developers with a cease and desist on December 21 arguing that the fan game’s release would “undercut the hard work and dedication of the highly creative people and innovative staff at Nintendo and The Pokémon Company, who have worked for over 2o years on the Pokémon franchise.”

Despite Koolboyman’s consent with the cease and desist, Pokemon Prism appeared on 4chan forums from pirates. According to the attached file, the pirates explained that they are “no way affiliated with” the fan game’s development team, and they got a copy — the latest version — from a careless developer. More specifically, they define themselves as “a group of people interested in seeing ROM hacks succeed.”

Since the leak, the original developers (minus Koolboyman) have reached out via Facebook. Wishing their fans a happy holidays, the developers reaffirmed that they did not distribute the file, nor do they know who the culprits are. However, due to the leak, the developers are planning to delete their Facebook Page for both Pokemon Brown (a rom hack of Pokemon Red) and Pokemon Prism. More important than anything, the developers of the project asked fans to continue to support Nintendo and thanked everyone enjoying the leaked game for their continued support.

As for Koolboyman, he had been down in the dumps following the cease and desist, but has seen an outpouring of support from the community since then.

So Pokemon Prism is now out in the wild, even with it’s own dedicated subreddit. With that said, users have been warned by the game’s dev team — if they choose to go against Nintendo’s wishes — to beware of any hidden malware by those looking to modify the game since they last touched it.

 /  Editor-in-Chief
Lou Contaldi is the Editor-in-Chief at DualShockers, specializing in both reviews and the business behind gaming. He began writing about tech and video games while getting his Juris Doctor at Hofstra University School of Law. He is maybe the only gaming journo based in Nashville, TN.