Microsoft Aims for Improved Matchmaking on Xbox One with New Smart Match Details

on July 31, 2013 8:31 AM

Rejoice, Xbox Live fans – your days of playing Call of Duty with whiny 13-year-olds may be coming to an end (or, at least happen with less ear-shattering frequency).

Yesterday Mike Lavin, the Senior Product Marketing Manager of Xbox Live, published a news update on Xbox’s official website with more details on the new Smart Match feature to be implemented with Xbox One.

Detailing the top three new features of Smart Match, Lavin detailed that Smart Match has been “completely reengineered for a new generation of gaming – using advanced algorithms to pair players,” highlighting attributes such as skill level, language, age, gameplay style, and their revamped Reputation system. Lavin further mentions that Smart Match aims to keep things balanced – “You won’t find yourself in way over your head but you’ll always have a good challenge.”

Using the Xbox One’s multitasking features implemented into the OS, Smart Match also aims to make the often dragging process of finding a match easier, as the feature will allow you to do other tasks while finding a match in a game (switch to Live TV, watch a video, or even start up a downloadable game), with notifications on-screen to alert you when a match has been prepared.

While also letting players share stats and form Parties or Beacons with players that aren’t currently on your Friends List, Microsoft is aiming to improve on the infrastructure of Xbox Live with their new console, and hopefully Smart Match seems to be adjusting to make the multiplayer experience on Xbox One that much easier.

Or, at the very least, it seems like we at least won’t be yelled at by 13-year-olds as much when we get sniped.

For more information on Smart Match and Xbox One, the original post by Mike Lavin can be viewed here.

Xbox One was announced this past May at a special Microsoft press event, and will see release later in 2013.

 /  Features Editor
Ryan is the Features Editor at DualShockers, with over five years' experience in the world of video games culture and writing. He holds a BA in English & Cinema from Binghamton University, and lives in New York City.
 [ 1 ]