Need For Speed Developer “Unleashes” On Gran Turismo 5

on November 30, 2010 7:00 PM

Need For Speed Developer

It would appear that Gran Turismo 5, a content rich driving simulator half a decade in the making, has been receiving mixed – if generally positive – reception. While throwing dirt on a rival isn’t considered the most poised plan of action, it is certainly of the gutsiest, especially when that rival is GT5.

Designer Andy Tudor from Slightly Mad Studios gets down, dirty and quite frank with his opinion of the game in an interview with Eurogamer:

Those two games (GT5 and Forza 3) are on pedestals at the moment. When we’re thinking about what we want to do in this game, it’s not a numbers game. We’re not going to add a thousand irrelevant cars. Both those games, to me, are almost like encyclopaedias. You’ve got a thousand cars, a thousand tracks, whatever, and basically the game is about earning cash to get another car, earning cash to get another car. It’s like a grind. It’s almost like stamp collecting.That’s not where the fun is. The fun is behind the wheel, feeling you’re on the edge, pushing it to the limit, putting in the cars that are relevant and cool to drive, allowing you to completely customise those from factory to the works level we had in Shift 1, and giving you the chance to then play against your friends in a social way.

You know it’s weird; whenever I see my friends playing this game, stamp collecting is the first thing that comes to mind. If you’re anything like me, Mr. Tudor leaves you with some pretty high expectations for NFS Shift 2: Unleashed which drops next spring. The game will be available for HD consoles and the PC.

[Eurogamer]

 /  Staff Writer
Kenneth is a Graphics and Game Design student who's worked as an author for DualShockers.com since June of 2010. His favorite gaming genres are Fighting, Role Playing and Sadistic Action games like Ninja Gaiden and Bayonetta. In addition to gaming, he is also strongly interested in music, fashion, art, culture, literature, education, religion, cuisine, photography, architecture, philosophy, film, dance, and most forms of creative expression.
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