NYCC 2013 Preview: Bayonetta 2 is a Slick, Sexy, and Over-the-top Spectacle for Wii U

on October 15, 2013 2:00 PM

Platinum Games’ Bayonetta was a blast of pure anime adrenaline – flashy combat, sexy style, and a heroine who flaunts it while transforming her bodysuit into a giant raging hair-monster that literally crushes her enemies not only highlights the purely insane gameplay, but what makes Bayonetta one of the best character action games available. After playing through a segment of the game in Nintendo’s booth at this past weekend’s New York Comic Con, it’s safe to say that Platinum is proudly flaunting Bayonetta‘s style and grace in glorious spectacle with their Wii U-exclusive follow-up, Bayonetta 2.

The demo of Bayonetta 2 provided a 15-20 minute section of the game that both showed off just what made Bayonetta such an enjoyably wacky action delight, but with plenty of the new moves that Bayonetta has apparently picked up in her time away since the last game. In this case, Bayonetta has perfected her previous moves while bringing a whole slew of new tricks up her sleeves: and hair, and gun-toting boots, and magical abilities, and way, way more.

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Even in a relatively short span like the 15 minutes or so that Platinum Games’ demo provided, Bayonetta 2 somehow managed to pack in some of the most wild and unbelieveable (or, maybe believeable in the world of Bayonetta, at least) combat scenarios imaginable, taking Bayonetta from fighting on top of a pair of fighter jets, to fighting centaur beasts on top of a bullet-speed train, to a climactic battle with a giant demon while climbing up a towering skyscraper – the only thing that could possibly have moved more quickly than the pace of the game was the game’s titular heroine herself. Throwing players from one ludicrous but absolutely-thrilling set-piece to another with blazing speed, Bayonetta 2 definitely ups the ante from the original game, but keeps its wild spirit and cheeky fun completely intact. Case in point: a wicked close-up on Bayonetta licking her lips with a sly wink, as in the background the demon she just defeated falls from the skyscraper after being mashed to death by her magic hair demon, Gomorrah.

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Bayonetta 2 brings bigger enemies and more wild and crazy combat scenarios, but Bayonetta herself is carrying even more options and combat variety than ever. With the ability to switch between two of her available weapons, her classic pair of twin pistols or a sweet pair of demonic katana, Bayonetta 2 remains incredibly fluid and nimble like its predecessor, especially with its huge range of combat options and abilities to move and dodge so seamlessly. While the bulky Wii U GamePad sometimes doesn’t quite lend itself naturally to a game so accuracy-intensive and fleet-of-the-moment as Bayonetta 2, it still nevertheless played well and switching between Bayonetta’s variety of punches, slashes, kicks, dodges, and (new and improved) Torture Attacks was seamless and fun, especially with the game’s central mechanic of “Witch Time” allowing for slow-motion combo-building after successful enemy dodges.

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While the 15-20 minutes of the Bayonetta 2 demo were action-packed and fun to watch (and even more fun to play), it will definitely be curious to see just how much more Platinum Games has is in store for the full game once it releases. After fighting on top of jets and taking down a giant monster on the side of a skyscraper, it’s tough to imagine just how much more that Platinum can up the ante, and how Bayonetta 2 can continue to build the momentum for a glorious, fulfilling climax. After the thrilling demo that Nintendo and Platinum had on offer, Bayonetta 2 has me on board with its hyper-violent but incredibly kinetic action – I’m just ready and willing to see what more punishment that Bayonetta 2¬†will bring once it releases on Wii U next year.

Bring it on, Bayonetta 2 – I’m ready for you.

For more on the game, check out all of our Bayonetta-related news.

 /  Features Editor
Ryan is the Features Editor at DualShockers, with over five years' experience in the world of video games culture and writing. He holds a BA in English & Cinema from Binghamton University, and lives in New York City.
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