Pokémon Go Developer Niantic is Being Sued Over Failed Pokémon Go Fest

Niantic scurries back to a Pokémon Center, protecting their exhausted assets from any further harm...

on July 29, 2017 10:52 PM

Last week DualShockers reported on Pokémon Go Fest and the introduction of the game’s first two legendary Pokémon, but we also mentioned how horribly the event went with outages and errors everywhere. This week some of event’s attendees are banding together to sue Niantic over just how bad the experience was.

Though the company offered $100 worth of Poke Coins and a complete refund for all tickets, these reimbursements did not fully cover the travel expenses that fans accrued including flights, hotels, and more. Though the event was held in Chicago, many of the loyal Pokémon Go players came from out of state, and even as far as out of the country.

These expenses are often times much greater than the cost of the ticket itself. The game, which has encouraged hundreds of thousands of players to get up and go outside in the past, also attracts players beyond your average gamer. Many attendees took off from work, or even flew with their families in order to get in on the action.

The lawyer who is organizing the lawsuit, Thomas Zimmerman, explained that attendees did not get the experience that they payed for, or that was advertised. In an interview with Polygon, Zimmerman explained the difference between receiving some in-game currency and being reimbursed for their entire trips:

“We’re not seeking any relief with respect to the failure to get legendary Pokémon, because Niantic is offering that, but Niantic is not offering to refund people’s travel expenses for coming to Chicago. Most of the people came from out of state, many people from other countries.”

Though Niantic has made attempts as mentioned above, they pale in comparison to the amount of time and money that fans invested to get themselves there. You can read more about the available times for the legendary birds here.

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Noah Buttner is a staff writer at Dualshockers. He specializes in textual and visual analysis and is based in New York, where he is pursuing a degree in Journalism from Stony Brook University.