PS4 Exclusive Detroit Gets New Info on Advanced Graphics, Engine, Gameplay and More

on June 15, 2016 6:54 PM

During PlayStation’s E3 live coverage, Quantic Dream Creative Director David Cage talked in depth about his upcoming PS4 game Detroit: Become Human, providing information on a variety of different topics including storytelling, gameplay, engine features, advanced visual effects and more.

  • In the game you play only androids. They are the good guys and humans are the bad guys.
  • Cage prefers the title Fahrenheit to Indigo Prophecy.
  • Kara and Connor are both playable characters, and “maybe there is more.”
  • The story isn’t played through cutscenes, but the player builds his own story through his action and choice.
  • All characters can die. There’s no game over, and if you don’t pay enough attention to one of your characters or make too many bad choices, you might lose one of your characters.
  • According to Cage, Quantic Dream is very lucky to have had the support of Sony for ten years. They started at E3 in 2006 with their first short “The Casting,” and it was a dream come true for them to present it at Sony’s booth.
  • The folks at Quantic Dream love developing engines, and each new game uses a different engine. They’re one of the few studios in the world to do that, “because that’s probably insane.”
  • With Detroit they wanted a specific look, and to develop a sense of cinematography in the engine, so they needed to develop specific features for the lighting, physically based shaders and what they call close-up lighting: when you have close-up shots of the characters they always have a specific lighting sets so that they always look great.
  • The game also uses “physical cameras,” which means that the camera lenses are based on real physics and real optics.
  • Kara” was just a technical demo at the time it was made. Quantic Dream wanted to write a short piece to test different emotions. It became very successful, and people kept asking what happened to Kara afterwards, and Cage actually did not have a clue. he became haunted by that question, so he had to imagine the world outside of the factory and what happened to the android afterwards, and that was the starting point for Detroit.
  • The interface is more traditional compared to Beyond: Two Souls and Heavy Rain, the team wanted a very simple and classic interface, because they wanted to tackle “the challenge of being in the mind of the player and not just on his thumbs.”
  • The game isn’t just a series of cutscenes, you control the characters and interact with the environment.
  • Quantic Dream wants to achieve the most branching experience they have ever created.
  • Cage tried virtual reality, and he was very surprised by the sense of presence it provides. He doesn’t think you can just port games to it, but you really need to design for design and find new answers and invent new systems for it.
  • Quantic Dream believed in storytelling since years ago, and back then they were a bit “alone” in thinking that storytelling and emotion could be a great addition to games. Some people laughed at them at that time, but today the situation has changed, not because of them, but just because it’s a natural evolution of the industry. Storytelling is great because it makes people feel involved and interested from the first second to the last second, and any type of game can benefit from a good and solid story and good characters. Cage himself is really happy that this is all coming together and that more games have better and better stories.
  • Cage is a big fan of The Last Guardian‘s creator Fumito Ueda, because he has a big sense of poetry, and a sense of storytrelling that, while being very different from Cage’s own style, manages to tell very interesting, deep and emotional stories, without any dialogue.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.
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