PS4 Sales Pass Five Million in Japan

PS4 has passed another sales milestone on the Japanese market.

on July 26, 2017 10:59 AM

Today’s Media Create charts combined with historical data reveal that PS4 has passed another sales milestone in Japan.

Keep in mind that we’re talking about sell-through to customers and not sell-in to retailer, as Media Create estimates the number of consoles that actually found a warm and loving Japanese home.

For the PS4 family of consoles, that number is  5,002,366 by Sunday, July 23rd, 2017, with sales last week that hit a solid 30,878 units despite the lack of major releases.

Of those units, 4,685,069 are standard PS4 consoles, while 317,297 are PS4 Pro units. Do keep in mind that Sony has kept supply of PS4 Pro units rather constrained in Japan since the console’s launch, and it’s not rare to find them sold out at major stores, especially in large cities.

PS4 launched rather weakly in Japan back in February 2014, mostly due to the scarcity of titles from Japanese developers which local gamers would find appealing. After the initial burst, sales basically flatlined for several months until the launch of Japanese games and a price cut revitalized them.

Currently, the PS4 family of console has been selling solidly in the country, with the prior milestone hit back in March, when it passed 4.5 million units. The latest worldwide figures from Sony are at 60.4 million units in June.

The PS4 is expected to do very well in the next few months in Japan, thanks to the release of strong titles led by Dragon Quest XI on July 29th.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.