Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

on March 10, 2010 11:22 PM

Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

Remember when you had life support techniques for your video games? And I don’t mean blowing into your game cartridges (we’ve all seen the Facebook fan pages), because as gamers we have gone beyond that. I know I’m not alone in this. Maybe you’re one of those people who would spin the disc in their Playstation then quickly close the lid and boot up the power. Or maybe you did something as simple as putting tape on the back of your Game Boy, because you cracked the battery cover. As gamers we know how to go around a problem, and I would like to share some of my life support experiences, and in turn maybe you can leave me with some of your own.

Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

Now to begin with, I have had a Super Nintendo since the age of 2. I also had a sister who was (and still is) 6 years older than I was. We fought a lot, so my Super Nintendo took a lot of punishment. What better way for a sister to take out her frustration than to try to break her little brother’s near and dear Super Nintendo. This is why I have grew fond of Nintendo products. The thing still works. It’s on life support, but it still works. You see the controller above? Both of my controllers look like the one above. They get held together by rubber bands, because the screws that hold the controller together are gone. Take a look:

Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

I’m not sure if you can see that really clearly, but the plastic that housed the screws are gone. That didn’t stop me though, I had to play my games. There were also some button issues, such as the start button didn’t work properly at one point, but I somehow fixed that too by taking the controller apart. Check out the system itself:

Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

A piece of the Super Nintendo’s AC adapter port broke off somehow and the power no longer plugs in properly. The only way to get the AC adapter to work (and continue working) is to bend the wire, like how it is shown above, and let the weight of the system itself hold it in place.

Another system that needed a little assistance was my original Xbox. I don’t have pictures, because I don’t have it anymore, but I don’t think I can photograph what I’m about to explain anyway. Back then, most of the early original Xboxes were prone to stop working. So, all this red ring stuff is nothing new. My Xbox worked fine for a while, but one day it started continuously opening its disc tray. When I would boot up the Xbox, the tray would come out. When I closed it, it would come out again. Eventually, I figured I just had to place my thumb to stop it from coming out when I booted up the system and it would stay shut. Problem solved. No biggie. However, my friend’s Xbox had a bit more of a problem. The Xbox was starting to not read discs anymore. He figured out a way to solve the problem though. All he had to do was place the disc exactly right, with the Xbox logo facing him, and placed neatly. It worked, but eventually his Xbox caved.

The things I had to do to continue my path of being a gamer. It was tough, but I’m grateful none of my systems ever caved. I never gave up on them and they never gave up on me. My Xbox 360 is still running fresh. I never had a red ring problem with both my 360’s, but check this out…

Remember When?: Your Systems Were on Life Support

My wired controller doesn’t power on anymore, unless it’s bent like this. It is held in place with tape. The battle continues…

 /  Community Manager & Editor
Working on the DualShockers staff as both an editor and community manager since late 2009, François is absolutely no stranger to the videogame industry. He is a graduate from the City College of New York, and has his Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations and Advertising. His next step is to obtain his Master's degree at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. Before starting his career, François has been gaming since the age of 2 with Super Mario World, and he has never looked back since. Gaming may be his profession, but it has always been his passion.