SCEJA President Talks PlayStation Vita TV, Can Use Bluetooth Keyboards, Explains Color and Strategy

on September 10, 2013 10:33 AM

Sony Computer Entertainment Japan and Asia President Hiroshi Kawano is one of the masterminds behind the Japanese announcement of the PlayStation Vita TV, and he gave some more details about it as part of an interview on Dengeki Online.

Here are a few relevant points:

  • The original PS Vita supported Bluetooth but not the HID (Human Interface Device) profile. Since the PS Vita TV adds HID support, it will be possible to connect Bluetooth keyboards and other devices.
  • The white color was chosen because the PS Vita is also targeted to people that never had contact with the PlayStation brand, and Sony wanted a “soft” image for the device. Since it will be placed near a TV they wanted it to “have a bit of presence, but still be easy to place”.
  • The PS Vita TV is not designed to be specialized on PS Vita games. PSP and PS One titles, PlayStation Plus, Video services and PS4 Remote Play are also important to its strategy. The concept that will be used to promote the device is “Let’s play with the TV”, meaning the many things that can be done on a TV.

The support for HID compatible devices is especially relevant, because it might help remove the current limitation on the use of all PS Vita games.

While Kawano only mention keyboards specifically, the possibility to connect a Bluetooth mouse (also compatible with the HID profile) to the device could prove a perfect replacement for the portable’s touch screen. We’ll have to wait and see if this will happen, but I wouldn’t exclude the possibility.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.