Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues Ends its Kickstarter Campaign Just Above Two Million Dollars

on April 7, 2013 2:01 PM

Another Kickstarter project just ended ended successfully. Richard Garriot’s Shroud of the Avatar: Forsaken Virtues ended it’s funding period just above two million dollars including pledges made on the official site.

At the moment of this writing we’re sitting at $2,037,641 from 23,158, and while funding on Kickstarter has ended, it’s still possible to pledge your support on the official site, pretty much like it is for Chris Roberts’ Star Citizen.

Mind you, according to me this is the best way to do crowd funding. While Kickstarter works with a finite funding period for obvious reasons,  there’s really no reason for stopping pledges when that period ends. Any money received is good money to make a game bigger and better, whether it is received in a month or in three.

While the project received twice as much as its intended goal, many may be surprised that a game with the weight of Richard Garriot’s name behind it didn’t actually gather more than that. Personally, I feel that Garriot pushed a bit too much on the “Everyone else does it wrong. I’ll do it right” key, turning off some potential backers. That’s just my personal speculation, though, so take it with a grain of salt.

On the other hand, it’s awesome to see another ambitious project coming to fruition in the Kickstarter galaxy, and Shroud of the Avatar is truly an ambitious and interesting one, so I’m looking forward to see what the development team (and one my favorite fantasy writers, Tracy Hickman) will create.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.