Sony Blamed for Nintendo’s Inability To Secure Third Party Games

on January 22, 2014 7:52 AM

The Japanese investment and market analysis firm ACE Securities released a report on Nintendo’s recent substantial reduction of the earning forecasts for the current fiscal year, and the document includes  some information on what the company expects from the corporate management policy briefing that will be held by President Satoru Iwata on January 30th.

In the corporate management policy briefing on January 30th the company is going to describe the future business policy:

1: Dealing with content development risks due to the consecutive failure to launch with high performance the 3DS and the Wii U.
2: Response to the problem of the inability to secure third party titles caused by SCE [Sony Computer Entertainment] investing heavily in the marketing cost of multiplatform software. 
3: Due to the soaring development costs of home consoles making difficult to ensure profitability, we hope to hear an answer on the building of a new business model.

It may seem a bit surprising to see Sony blamed for Nintendo’s struggle in securing third party titles for its consoles. I’m assuming the analyst who wrote the report was thinking about the Wii U and not about the 3DS here, because otherwise he’s overlooking one big name: Monster Hunter.

That said, we can definitely assume that many keen eyes will be watching the briefing on the 30th. We’ll have to wait for that date to know whether Nintendo will steer its business policies around radically, or will keep marching straight on the same path.

Update: we checked out the track record of the predictions on the Wii U of the analyst that wrote this report, and it’s definitely an interesting read.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.
 [ 176 ]