Sony Granted a SubPoena to Identify Potential Hackers

on March 7, 2011 2:30 PM

Sony Granted a SubPoena to Identify Potential Hackers

A small victory has been made in Sony’s court battle against George Hotz, the man who hacked the PlayStation 3. An American court has granted them a subpoena which will allow them to view the visitor logs of Hotz’ website as they attempt to research the extent of the damage. Their primary goal at the moment is to prove that a relevant number of people who had access to the hack are based in California where they would prefer to fight the legal war, as opposed to New Jersey, where Hotz lives.

Google and BlueHost have been ordered to release “all server logs, IP address logs, account information, account access records and application or registration forms” for Hotz’ websites. In addition sites like Youtube and Twitter were included in the subpoena, with YouTube being required to release “all records or usernames and IP addresses that have posted or published comments” made in response to the video that demonstrated Hotz’ jailbreaking of the PS3, and Twitter to release “documents sufficient to identify all names, addresses, and telephone numbers associated with [Hotz’s] Twitter account”.

[Wired]

 /  Staff Writer
John is what you might call something of a badass. When he's not writing about games or playing them, he's playing in the Kansas City band "Documentary" and drinking as many different beers as often as he can. He's a huge comic nerd in the best sense of the term, with a particular love for the Creator Owned movement.