The Witcher 3’s PS4/Xbox One Optimization Going Better than Expected; Differences with PC Explained

on August 17, 2014 5:46 AM

The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt is one of the most anticipated titles for the beginning of next year, and many are wondering how it’ll hold up on consoles compared to PC.

We had a chance to chat with Viausl Effects Artists Jose Teixeira at Gamescom, and he gave us some more color on the issue.

Teixeira explained that the screen space ambient occlusion (SSAO) will be slightly different, the water in the ocean won’t have the same advanced tassellation, and there are other “tiny little sacrifices” that “hopefully won’t make a huge visual impact” but will give a big performance advantage.

He also mentioned that optimization on consoles is going a lot better than expected from the very start.

To explain that he brought up a little fun anecdote: the first time the folks at CD Projekt tried to run The Witcher 2 on Xbox 360, it wouldn’t run at all. It just crashed.

The first time they tried to render Wild Hunt on the new generation of consoles, it resulted only in a black screen, and everybody was overjoyed.

That may sound strange, but the black screen meant that the game was actually running, just not rendering properly, while on the previous game the team had to do a lot of work to even get to the black screen.

Teixeira continued by mentioning that the game is surprisingly running pretty well on consoles already, with some areas already running at 30 fps. While he doesn’t know if the final frame rate will be dynamic or locked, it’ll be at least 30 frames per second and console gamers can expect really impressive graphics.

Stay tuned for the full interview soon, and believe me, if you love geeky tech talk, you really don’t want to miss that one.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.
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