Twitch has “No Intention” of Running Audio-Recognition on Live Streams, Adds Appeal Tool for Incorrectly Flagged Videos

on August 8, 2014 6:52 AM

Popular streaming service Twitch will not be cracking down on music usage in live streams, CEO Emmett Shear has said.

Twitch’s announcement yesterday that it would be regulating songs played by streamers brought much criticism from its fanbase. Speaking in an AMA on Reddit, Shear stated that these changes will only apply to archived videos; the company does not plan to crack down on live streams.

We have no intention whatsoever of bringing audio-recognition to live streams on Twitch. This is a VOD-only [VOD stands for video on demand, an archived video] change for Twitch.

Shear also noted that Twitch had heard the complaints in regards to the program, but stated that the crackdown on audio was something his company was doing to protect its streamers.

Believe me or not, I have no desire whatsoever to hurt or piss off the Twitch community. We wouldn’t do this if I thought there was a better way. Unfortunately, as far as I can tell, there isn’t.

However, Shear gave no reason as to why the system was only being put in now, as opposed to in years prior.

Shear also stated that any crackdowns on in game music were accidental, with the audio recognition only supposed to pick up on licensed songs. He ntoed that has with any new system, the audio recongition had bugs which were causing it to register in game music incorrectly.

Later today, Twitch announced that it was implementing an appeal system for those who felt that their audio had been inappropriately muted, something Emmet noted should have been in place before the audio recognition system went live.

Twitch has also announced that it will allow videos of any length to be saved, a break from yesterday’s chain of announcements where it said that only videos would have a maximum length of 2 hours.