Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End Lead Game Designer Finds Preview Mistake “Pretty Scary”

on October 15, 2015 5:58 PM

By now many are aware about the Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End preview fiasco on a relevant British website. The site posted a since removed preview titled “Is Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End too formulaic?” The problem was that the writer mistook his playthrough of Uncharted: The Nathan Drake Collection at Tokyo Game Show for a hands-on session of  Uncharted 4.

The editor in charge has since apologized and the article has been removed, but of course the internet reacted quite violently. Some at Naughty Dog took the issue with a bit of irony, as you can see at the bottom of the post, and Co-Lead Designer Anthony Newman expressed his opinion on Twitter.

We’re not here to judge. Mistakes happen, and it’s not like we never made any ourselves. I’ve been at many trade shows and I can testify that stress and fatigue levels can get extremely high, as you bounce around the booths like a flipper ball on extremely tight schedules, possibly triggering major screw-ups.

This year, Tokyo Game Show was also a veritable oven, with almost unprecedented levels of heat, humidity and crowd, making things worse.

That said, we have to heed Newman’s message: often we underestimate the effects of what we write, and we’re tempted to chalk mistakes in our reporting as something that isn’t a big deal. After all, it’s just games, isn’t it?

Only, it isn’t just about games. It’s about the work of many men and women that put passion, tears and sweat into what they love creating, pretty much like we do. It’s important to keep that responsibility always clearly in mind, and pay extra attention to the accuracy of what we write.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.