Valkyria Chronicles Remastered PS4 vs PC Screenshot Comparison: Small Differences for a Beautiful Classic

on February 10, 2016 3:18 PM

Valkyria Chronicles Remastered was released today in Japan, bringing back the franchise to home consoles. It’s obviously a fairly massive improvement over the PS3 version of the game, but how does it compare against the PC port released in 2014?

If you own the PS3 version and you loved it, it’s easy to find reasons to double dip in the sheer quality of the game and in the 1080p and 60 frames per seconds boasted by the PS4 remaster, but if you have the PC port on steam, you might wonder whether there have been improvements, and if double (or triple) dipping is worth it.

Below you can see an in-depth comparison made with ten pairs of direct feed screenshots from the PS4 and PC versions. They’re in lossless PNG format in order to give you the best possible idea of the quality on both platforms, and they attempt to reproduce exactly the same scenes.

Within each pair, the PS4 version will come first, and the PC version second.

The first screenshot is from the first cutscene of the game (which is actually pre-rendered like all anime-style cutscenes). Basically the only difference is that the PC version is slightly more blurry. This is a difference that you’ll see across the whole game.

In this screenshot you can notice the slightly stronger anti-aliasing on PC, that makes everything slightly more blurry across the whole screen.

The same difference in anti-aliasing can be seen here. I won’t repeat it anymore, but you’ll notice it in every single pairing from now on. Interestingly, foliage also shows a bit more definition on PS4.

The same difference in foliage definition can be seen in this pairing, from an in-engine dialogue scene.

The map appears to have been slightly redesigned, with stronger dashed shadows on PS4 and different labels for streets and landmarks. For instance “Mill Fountain” has become “Pinwheel Fountain.”

Here we see the same difference in the definition of foliage as before in favor of the PS4 version. In the PS4 version, environmental textures also show more details, with drawn elements like bricks and the like that stand out more. Strangely, if you look at the hit numbers at the top, on the PS4 version they seem to be excessively sharpened, creating a slightly jagged effect. This same effect also appears on character portraits when selected. In the PC version they’re much smoother. Dashed shadows are more prominent in the PS4 version.

Close up shots on characters are nearly identical, with an extremely small difference in the shadows, but it’s very difficult to notice.

In this pairing, the difference in definition for environmental textures is quite evident, especially on the walls of the mill. The boundaries of the map have also been made slightly less visible on the PS4 version.

The difference in environmental textures definition also carries over in dialogue scenes.

Vehicles appear to be slightly better defined in their textures on the PS4 version, but the difference is so small that it could be due to the stronger anti-aliasing on PC. It’s worth mentioning that the difference in texture detail becomes more visible on objects far away from the camera.

Ultimately, the two versions are close to identical, Which one is the best for you probably depends on whether you prefer a slightly softer overall look on PC, or graphics that are a bit sharper on PS4.

Is the PS4 purchase worth your money if you already own the PC version? Your mileage may vary on this. Personally, I’m going to quadruple dip when the English PS4 version will come out this spring, but it’s mostly to support a franchise that really deserves it.

Incidentally, if you want to see the PS4 remaster in motion, you can check it out here.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.
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