Valkyria Revolution PS4 VS PS Vita Screenshot Comparison: a Very Visible Difference

on January 4, 2017 10:16 AM

Valkyria Revolution will come for both PS4 and PS Vita in Japan, and will even get a stray Xbox One version on top of those in the west, that said, Sega isn’t exactly waving the PS Vita version around in its promotional assets. If you don’t intend to go through the fairly laborious process of getting the Japanese demo, you might be wondering what the differences are with the PS4 version.

First of all, a small disclaimer: there won’t be a PS4 Pro vs PS4 comparison, because the demo doesn’t appear to support PS4 Pro, at least for what concerns visuals. Resolution, models, textures and level of detail are identical. This doesn’t mean that the final game won’t support PS4 Pro, as Sony promised that it will, but simply that support hasn’t been implemented in the demo itself just yet. That’s actually good news, because there is a chance that the game will look better on the souped-up version of the PS4.

On the other hand, the demo enables us to get a clear idea of the difference between the PS4 and the PS Vita versions of the game. I’ve read many comments alleging that Valkyria Revolution looks like a PS Vita game on PS4, but you might really want to wait and see the PS Vita version before you say that. It’s true that it isn’t a technological miracle, but it looks nothing like a PS Vita game, or at least nothing like its own PS Vita version.

In the gallery below, you can see pairs of screenshots from both versions of the demo, with the PS4 version first, and the PS Vita version following in each pair.

The first difference is that the PS Vita version does not feature the GOUACHE rendering engine. This means that on PS Vita images won’t be filtered in a way that makes them look like they’re painted on canvas. On the other hand, if you don’t like this kind of filter, this might be a reason to opt for the PS Vita version over the one on PS4.

Obviously, there is also a big difference in resolution, with the PS4 rendering at 1080p and the PS Vita at 980×544. Four times as many pixels certainly make a large difference in level of detail and aliasing, but that’s far from the only one.

Lighting is a lot more advanced on PS4, with much more detailed shadows and less saturated colors, while higher texture resolution contributes to make everything look more detailed.

Last, but certainly not least, there is a large difference in the detail of 3D models, which are much simpler (and in some cases absent) on PS Vita, losing a lot in definition. even more so in the distance.

This is especially visible with foliage and vegetation. Trees are extremely simplified on PS Vita, often appearing like a pixelated mess, and ground vegetation like grass and flowers is completely absent.

In conclusion, the PS4 version of Valkyria Revolution isn’t really among the prettiest games out there (even if it does match quite faithfully the style of its character designer Hiro Kiyohara), but at least it runs circles around the visuals of the PS Vita version.

It remains to be seen what Valkyria Revolution will look like on PS4 Pro and Xbox One, even if I expect the version on Microsoft’s console to be pretty much identical to the one on PS4.

If you want to make your own comparison, you can download the demo on the Japanese PlayStation Store for PS4 and for PS Vita. Of course you’ll need a Japanese PSN account, and you can find out how to make one in our handy guide. If you plan on trying the PS Vita version, you may also find useful our new guide on how to use a Japanese PSN account on your PS Vita without losing your data.

Valkyria Revolution will be released in Japan on January 19th for PS4 and PS Vita, while a western release will come for PS4, PS Vita and Xbox One next Spring.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.