What’s The Right Price Point for ‘Playstation Now’?

on January 7, 2014 10:57 PM

Sony revealed ‘Playstation Now‘ during CES 2014. The service will let gamers play games from Sony’s library on their Sony consoles as well as on tablets, smartphones and televisions. You’ll be able to get games either by renting individual titles or via a subscription which will give you access to many titles. Sounds pretty cool right? Yeah it does. The question is (as the title of this editorial asks), what’s the right price point for this service?

Before I get into it, I should say that, yep, you’re gonna have to pay for this.

“Buh-buh-but I have Playstation Plus! I should get this for free!”

Sorry buddy, it doesn’t work like that. This service is being provided by Gaikai, a company Sony paid millions to buy. You really think that they’re just going to add this as part of PS+? NOPE. You’re going to have to pay for this separately. This is something you’ll just have to accept.

With that said, how much WILL this cost? Let’s speculate shall we?

People are already used to subscribing to services like Netflix, Hulu, and Crunchyroll. These services usually come out to be around $8-$12 or so. This would be the ideal model to use for Playstation Now. That isn’t exactly a lot of money to pay a month. Sony could also charge people around $50-$60 for a yearly subscription. That would be less than you’d pay monthly. It might be a good idea to keep it to $50 since that’s also the same price of Playstation Plus.

Now, that’s the IDEAL situation. The other scenario that could happen would be if this was a tiered service. For example, Playstation 2 games could cost you $10 a month while Playstation 3 games could be $20. For $30 you might be able to get Sony’s complete back catalog. $30 a month sounds expensive but considering that you’d be getting the entirety of the PS library to play on your Playstation consoles, TVs, tablets and smartphones, asking for $30 a month doesn’t seem that unreasonable.

We don’t know what the actual price of this service will be but it would be in Sony’s favor to keep it reasonably affordable. If it costs too much money then people will stay away from it. Sony needs to find that sweet spot where they can get the most amount of people to subscribe to this service while netting themselves a nice profit.

 

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Tony has been a gamer ever since he came to the United States from the Dominican Republic when he was a kid. He's been a geek since he could draw his first breath and will be one until he draws his last. In addition to video games, Tony loves Comic Books, Anime, Science Fiction and Fantasy. If it's geeky then Tony is most likely into it.