Xbox 360 Being Used to Detect Heart Defects

on September 25, 2009 9:19 AM

Some folks thought that the Xbox 360’s hardware was as useless as a quadriplegic prostitute in Las Vegas. With perpetual Red Rings of Death that have been plaguing the console since its inception, some fans of the console have ceased to believe in a merciful god, along the lines of just completely giving up on Microsoft’s second next gen console. Apparently, though, rather than causing emotional distress amongst the community, the Xbox 360 is now being used to alleviate our hearts.

A computer scientist at the University of Warwick in England recently did some console modifications to allow his Xbox 360 to calculate heart rhythms using a complex algorithm. Microsoft’s console is capable of performing these calculations five times faster (and about 10 times cheaper) than a lab computer. Can we say, hold that?

Two consoles this generation are being used to better mankind in its endeavors to help people live longer. Microsoft’s Xbox 360 is now being used to cure heart disease, while Sony’s PlayStation 3 is being used to cure cancer. Ha! And they said gaming would never amount to anything. We can’t leave Nintendo out, of course. Although their gimmicky console doesn’t have the horsepower of its competitors, the Wii is certainly helping some overweight folk shed pounds from their flabby bodies. Titles like Wii Fit, Wii Yoga, and Wii Sports – which are aimed at not only being entertaining, but good for the health as well – have contributed to helping folks overcome obesity and diabetes, and whatever else fat people get.

To sum it up, gaming is helping the world live longer. Wow. I never thought I’d say those words in my lifetime.

 /  Co-Founder
Born and raised in New York City, Yaris is one of three co-founders at DualShockers. Gaming since the inception of Nintendo in the 80's, he has grown to avidly appreciate games of every genre, maturing his preference specifically now to third-person action games, first-person shooters and JRPGs. He's a software engineer, father and husband during the day, and mildly attempts to hold onto his "hardcore gamer" title during the evenings. An attempt that he tends to fail miserably at.