Classic Visual Novel Saya no Uta by Gen Urobuchi is Getting a Sequel in Novel Form

Classic Visual Novel Saya no Uta by Gen Urobuchi is Getting a Sequel in Novel Form

Saya no Uta is getting a novel adaptation by Gen Urobuchi and Suzuki Otsuki, and a sequel to this novel is coming in spring 2019.

Saya no Uta is getting a novel adaptation, releasing on December 14 in Japan. The novel version will be written by Suzuki Otsuki and Gen Urobuchi, and with illustrations by Higashiguchi Chuuou, who also handled CG illustrations on the original game.

Furthermore, a sequel, also in novel form, is planned by Nitroplus for Spring 2019 release. Otsuki-san commented on Twitter saying he can’t say anything about the sequel, except that it’s a direct sequel, and that he definitely understands the people who think the story does not need one. Technically, the sequel novel will follow the novel adaptation’s story releasing in December, not the game’s story from 15 years ago. As such, there’s no problem as to which ending to go from. Otsuki-san also said that this first novel releasing in December has a clear ending, that Saya’s story is all done in it, with no hanging plotlines. That way, fans who do not wish to read a sequel can just read this one and ignore the upcoming sequel.

Saya no Uta was developed by Nitroplus and was released for PC in 2003 in Japan. The game’s story, penned by Gen Urobuchi,  is a psychological horror story inspired by Lovecraft works. It is widely recognized as a masterpiece and as one of Gen Urobuchi’s best works. Saya no Uta has been fan-translated in English, Chinese, Korean, French, Russian, Vietnamese, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese and Polish.

Personally, I’m not very fond of Saya no Uta, mostly because I dislike horror, even though I love 7th Expansion games. I’d say Phantom of Inferno is my favorite Gen Urobuchi work, followed by Psycho-Pass, though I have yet to watch the sequels. As for Madoka Magica, his most popular work, I love it as well, though I prefer considering the story ends with the original TV anime. I also disagree with the many people calling it revolutionary, as many other magical girls stories in the past already had dark elements and plot twists similar to Madoka Magica. One good example, which released only a few years before Madoka Magica, is Uta∽Kata.