Devil May Cry 5 Will be About 15 Hours Long, According to the Game’s Director

Devil May Cry 5 Will be About 15 Hours Long, According to the Game’s Director

Going off of Capcom's internal estimates, Devil May Cry 5 will take roughly 15 hours for players to beat.

Action games like Devil May Cry tend to not be on the lengthy side more often than not. Most games in the genre seem to average anywhere from 8-12 hours in play time and that usually is more than enough, at least in my own opinion. With the arrival of Devil May Cry 5 coming in March though, the game’s director has recently revealed that this might be one action title that is a bit longer than normal.

During a Q&A session in Seoul recently (and as transcribed by GameShot), Devil May Cry 5 director Hideaki Itsuno was asked just how long the game would last this time around. Itsuno-san said that going off of their internal playthroughs and tests of the game, they expect that Devil May Cry 5 will take about 15 hours to see through to the end.

If this is indeed an accurate estimate, then it would seemingly be the longest game in the DMC franchise, at least by comparison to average runtimes from the other games in the series based off of numbers from How Long to Beat’s website. Considering how great everything has looked from DMC 5 so far though and that this is the first numbered entry in the series in over a decade, you won’t find me complaining if this game ends up being longer than others.

In other Devil May Cry 5 news, Capcom announced yesterday that a new demo for the game will be arriving next month on both PS4 and Xbox One. This demo will be different than the one that Capcom released last month and was exclusively playable on Xbox One.

Luckily, we don’t have much longer to wait to see if Itsuno-san’s play time estimate will be true as Devil May Cry 5 is slated to release on March 8 for PS4, Xbox One, and PC. You can still pre-order the game over on Amazon right now if you’re interested.


This post contains affiliate links where DualShockers gets a small commission on sales. Any and all support helps keep DualShockers as a standalone, independent platform for less-mainstream opinions and news coverage.