Dying Light 2 Cuts Ties with Narrative Designer Chris Avellone

Dying Light 2 Cuts Ties with Narrative Designer Chris Avellone

Dying Light 2 will no longer be featuring the work of Chris Avellone following recent allegations related to sexual abuse and harassment.

Techland’s upcoming action-adventure sequel Dying Light 2 was prominently set to feature contributions from writer Chris Avellone, who previously is known for his work on titles such as Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II and Fallout: New Vegas. In light of new allegations, however, developer Techland has now announced that its partnership with Avellone will not be continuing.

Over the past few days, multiple accounts of sexual abuse and harassment involving Avellone have come to light. In response, Techland has since released a statement on social media acknowledging these allegations and in the process making it known that Avellone is no longer working with the studio on Dying Light 2.

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“We treat matters of sexual harassment and disrespect with the utmost care, and have no tolerance for such behaviors – it applies to both our employees as well as external consultants, Chris among them,” Techland said in a written statement. “This is why, together with Chris Avellone, we’ve decided to end our cooperation.” Techland went on to say that it is still working hard on Dying Light 2 and that the team is progressing well with its development.

While losing Avellone certainly won’t be a major deal for Techland’s development of Dying Light 2, this situation is more of a black eye on the game than anything. Notably, Avellone ended up being the presenter for Dying Light 2 when the game was first unveiled back at Microsoft’s E3 2018 showcase. As such, he’s been one of the primary faces attached to the project over the years. To see Techland quickly disassociated themselves from Avellone is a smart decision for the company for a vast number of reasons.

Dying Light 2 was originally slated to launch this spring on PS4, Xbox One, and PC, but was delayed indefinitely earlier this year to a yet-to-be-determined window.

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