Final Fantasy XV Broke Even with Development Costs on Day One

Final Fantasy XV is already a profitable game, and it broke even much earlier than many expected: on the day it launched.

on February 7, 2017 4:45 AM

Many have been speculating on how many copies Final Fantasy XV would need to sell in order to break even, and DualShockers asked just that to Director Hajime Tabata during a recent visit to the Business Division 2 development floor in Tokyo,

Tabata-san clarified that not only Final Fantasy XV already has already broken even with its development costs, but it did so on day one, which means when it launched on November 29th.

Square Enix announced almost immediately that the day one shipments, including digital downloads, were over five million copies, marking the fastest selling Final Fantasy game ever at its debut.  This means that those five million copies were enough to recoup costs, even if we don’t know by how much.

In January, we heard that the number of copies sold had grown to six millions, so it’s safe to assume that the title is now firmly in profitable territory.

If you want to read more, Tabata-san also revealed that the game is currently being used as a development environment to test visual fidelity, and 70% of its staff are still at work on free and paid additional content.

Speaking of DLC, Square Enix recently showcased a trailer of Episode Gladiolus and Episode Prompto, and If you want to see something even more interesting, you can also check out an early prototype of the regalia modified to drive off-road.

 /  Executive News Editor
Hailing from sunny (not as much as people think) Italy and long standing gamer since the age of Mattel Intellivision and Sinclair ZX Spectrum. Definitely a multi-platform gamer, he still holds the old dear PC nearest to his heart, while not disregarding any console on the market. RPGs (of any nationality) and MMORPGs are his daily bread, but he enjoys almost every other genre, prominently racing simulators, action and sandbox games. He is also one of the few surviving fans of the flight simulator genre on Earth.