Microsoft Provides Clarification on Game Streaming Rules for Content on YouTube and Twitch

on January 16, 2015 11:15 AM

With the growing popularity of YouTube and Twitch as platforms for streaming game content such as Let’s Plays, strategy videos, walkthroughs and more, more and more companies are providing both cooperation and rules in regard to what can and can’t be streamed, with Microsoft’s latest rules providing some questions that needed clarification.

Last week, Microsoft established a new set of rules in regard to streaming Microsoft-produced titles, with the new Game Content Usage Rules including a rule where game titles couldn’t be included in the names of videos, leading to confusion amongst users.

In a new post on Major Nelson’s blog, Microsoft provided clarification on this particular clause of its latest update that using the title of a game in a referential way (“Let’s Play Forza Motorsport 5“, etc.) are okay, but using the title of the game in a way that may be seen as officially tied to the game is not allowed, to avoid confusion with consumers. Microsoft’s Larry “Major Nelson” Hryb clarified in the post:

We’ve heard the feedback and will be updating the language in the policy to provide some more examples and clarification of this clause with the revised version below:

In addition, your Items may not use the name of the Microsoft Game in their title to give the impression that Microsoft is the source of the Item, or authorized or endorsed the Item. Items that make referential use of our titles are fine, for example, “Let’s Play Forza Motorsport 5” or “Tips and Strategies for Halo 5.” Using the Game title to tag your Item on social media is fine. We also don’t object to “Red vs. Blue” or “Operation Chastity”. But we may object to “Halo: Covenant Strike,” for example, if it could be confused as something Microsoft produced or licensed, or if it could be mistaken as an official part of the Game. We just want to make sure consumers don’t get confused.

 /  Features Editor
Ryan is the Features Editor at DualShockers, with over five years' experience in the world of video games culture and writing. He holds a BA in English & Cinema from Binghamton University, and lives in New York City.