Three Nex Machina Behind the Scenes Videos Release Detailing Physics, Level Design, and Weapons

Housemarque has released a load of new details about its new twin-stick shooter Nex Machina. Learn about the game's level designs, enemy designs, weapons, and much more!

on June 13, 2017 8:41 PM

Housemarque has released three behind the scenes videos for its upcoming twin-stick arcade shooter, Nex Machina, detailing a few of the core elements that set this title apart from similar games the developer has previously created.

In the first video, Housemarque explores what it means to have a voxel-based engine. The engine used in Nex Machina was based on the one used in Resogun, but a few changes needed to be made in order to accomplish what the team was looking for. Additionally, the video discusses the “fluid simulation” technology featured in the game, noting how water reacts as players shoot over it or as things fall into it.

Tech Team Lead at Housemarque, Antii Kerminen, is a smart guy who knows a lot about his game and how it was made. When talking about the voxel engine, putting it as simply as possible, Kerminen noted that in Nex Machina they “use a lot of particles.” Fortunately Housemarque’s Head of Publishing, Mikael Haveri was interviewing Kerminen, sometimes communicating his descriptions in plainer language. After Kerminen was finished explaining the amount of activity occurring on screen, Haveri further explained.

“The game is so fast, you might not see everything. Pause the game and enjoy all of that detail that we’ve been able to create in the background, because honestly you won’t notice it if you just play the game.”

The second video provided by Housemarque discusses how bullet patterns are different in Nex Machina than in other games, as well as how enemies were crafted. It also explains the game’s level desgin and why future levels are visible on each stage. Again, Mikael Haveri was there asking questions, this time to Senior Level Designer Henri Mustonen.

Haveri: In Resogun there were a lot of bullet hell elements. How does that work in Nex Machina? Is it any different?

Mustonen: Whenever I go to a room and I see it’s a turret enemy, I know what kind of beam it will shoot. There’s always something that you can count on.

We figure that every single enemy needs to have a role and a place.

It’s with this technique of giving enemies roles that Housemarque has been able to ensure levels feel complete and that there is an appropriate level of difficulty involved.

The last of the video trio released discusses the ever-important need to rescue humans (reminiscent from Resogun’s urging to “Save the last human”) in Nex Machina, and the game’s special weapons, which will “take everything apart.” In this video, Mikael Haveri interviewed Media Designer Rudolf Westerholm. Here’s a snippet of their discussion regarding how players might utilize the different special weapons available in the game.

Haveri: I know at least four of the kinds: Powershot, Rocket Launcher, Sword, and Smart Bomb.

Westerholm: If you want to just play as fast as you want, then you might need a different weapon for that, or if you want to actually be able to grasp as much points as you want, then you maybe you want to go with something else.

In Nex Machina, humans have grown too dependent on technology and have allowed machines to attain consciousness and extraordinarily surpass humans, establishing themselves as far superior. With that realization, they begin to exterminate humanity.

Nex Machina recently went through a closed beta weekend as Housemarque continues to put finishing touches on the game. It is scheduled to release on PC and PlayStation 4 on June 20. For more information on Nex Machina, check out the game’s official website or stay tuned to DualShockers for further coverage.

DualShockers’ own Logan Moore recently interviewed Housemarque’s Mikael Haveri, so be sure to check out that interview when you get the chance.

 /  Staff Writer
Jordan is a Staff Writer at DualShockers, where he covers the latest in indies and collectibles. He has a degree in Creative Writing from University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire. He is currently based out of Portland, OR.