Nintendo Will Continue to Leave Censorship of Third-Party Games Up to Rating Boards

Nintendo Will Continue to Leave Censorship of Third-Party Games Up to Rating Boards

After Nintendo built a kid and family-friendly image, it is a bit weird to see their new take on censorship.

Growing up, Nintendo had always felt like the family-friendly console. Sure, there could be generally creepy titles such as the lonesome adventure of Samus in Super Metroid. However, when it came to sexual content or gore, the big N usually steered clear. So, it is a little weird for the company to be so open with it on the Switch.

During its Annual General Meeting of Shareholders, Shuntaro Furukawa answered many questions regarding the company. One of the questions revolved around if Nintendo would censor third-party games on the Switch similarly to how Sony has introduced some new censorship tactics.

Furukawa responded letting it known that Nintendo wouldn’t get involved with censorship and would leave that up to the rating boards like the CERO and the ESRB. On top of that, he made sure to mention that parents still can use the parental control functions that are available on the switch so that they can protect their children from adult content.

Also, Furukawa mentioned that if platform-holding companies started censoring titles, it could hurt the diversity and fairness in game software. He stated: “Nintendo, as do 3rd-parties and their software, applies for an objective rating from 3rd-party organizations prior to release. If platform-holding companies choose arbitrarily, the diversity and fairness in game software would be significantly inhibited. We provide parental controls that can be used to apply limits”

I am not surprised at the companies new take on censorship. During the Wii and Wii U eras, Nintendo never really had the third-party support to bring more suggestive content to their line of consoles. Now that the Switch is capable to support those titles and the console is selling so well, it doesn’t surprise me that they are taking this stance. Yet, it does sound weird coming from Nintendo. But maybe not as weird as SNES titles still not being on their online service yet.